What are the benefits of massage?
Find out below!

Ever wondered how a massage makes you feel so good? Or how a dog massage seems to give your dog the energy of a puppy? We answer all your questions and more.

A. A massage stimulates a relaxation and mechanical response.
When your heart and breathing rate slows, muscles relax and you produce less stress hormones (all of which normally happens in a massage), your body is in a state of relaxation, which increases serotonin. This chemical helps us to have more positive emotions and thoughts.

The mechanical response is linked to increased blood and lymph circulations and the release
of nerves and tissue. To sum it up, you may feel happier, less stressed and experience better
overall health.

A. Yes and no. More ‘intensive’ massages, such as deep tissue, may hurt to some extent,
however most people say it is a ‘good hurt’. Your massage therapist should work to a
comfortable level for you, so please speak up if you are experiencing discomfort.

A. First of all, don’t stress. Having sore muscles the day after a deep-tissue massage is
normal. During a massage, your muscles are stretched, manipulated and increased blood
circulation is sent to any tight areas. While you’re working your muscles in a different way to a
workout, the effect is similar, leaving you with a little tenderness.

A. A massage’s immune support and tension-relief properties will help progress a cold,
therefore yes, it will shorten the length of your flu. It depends on what stage of a cold you are
at. Some clients prefer to ‘bring it on and get it over with’, which the massage will certainly do.
For others who are already feeling worse for wear, this isn’t so great, so you may prefer to skip
the massage and let the cold progress slowly, at a natural pace. If you’re in the first stages
(around three days) then you shouldn’t risk infecting others, refraining from going to work, the
shops and massages.

A. Studies suggest yes! Benefits have been linked to many areas, including helping with
stress, pain relief, insomnia and injury recovery, to name a few.

A. It really depends on the person. For professional athletes, some see a massage therapist
several times a week. Someone who has a physical job or visits the gym daily may see a
massage therapist once a week. The average person will benefit from a regular massage once
a month.

A. Massage provides good balance for the canine body and great harmony for their minds. It is
good for canine muscles but also aids in relaxing and lengthening the tendons and ligaments
as well, especially in senior dogs.

A. Almost definitely! With age, dogs tend to become stiff and experience discomfort regularly.
A massage will help increase their flexibility, improve circulation and oxygen to the brain and
also detect medical issues that may be or become an issue.

What are the benefits of massage?
Find out below!

A. A massage stimulates a relaxation and mechanical response.
When your heart and breathing rate slows, muscles relax and you produce less stress hormones (all of which normally happens in a massage), you body is in a state of relaxation, which increases serotonin. This chemical helps us to have more positive emotions and thoughts.

The mechanical response is linked to increased blood and lymph circulations and the release
of nerves and tissue. To sum it up, you may feel happier, less stressed and experience better
overall health.

A. Yes and no. More ‘intensive’ massages, such as deep tissue, may hurt to some extent,
however most people say it is a ‘good hurt’. Your massage therapist should work to a
comfortable level for you, so please speak up if you are experiencing discomfort.

A. First of all, don’t stress. Having sore muscles the day after a deep-tissue massage is
normal. During a massage, your muscles are stretched, manipulated and increased blood
circulation is sent to any tight areas. While you’re working your muscles in a different way to a
workout, the effect is similar, leaving you with a little tenderness.

A. A massage’s immune support and tension-relief properties will help progress a cold,
therefore yes, it will shorten the length of your flu. It depends on what stage of a cold you are
at. Some clients prefer to ‘bring it on and get it over with’, which the massage will certainly do.
For others who are already feeling worse for wear, this isn’t so great, so you may prefer to skip
the massage and let the cold progress slowly, at a natural pace. If you’re in the first stages
(around three days) then you shouldn’t risk infecting others, refraining from going to work, the
shops and massages.

A. Studies suggest yes! Benefits have been linked to many areas, including helping with
stress, pain relief, insomnia and injury recovery, to name a few.

A. It really depends on the person. For professional athletes, some see a massage therapist
several times a week. Someone who has a physical job or visits the gym daily may see a
massage therapist once a week. The average person will benefit from a regular massage once
a month.

A. Massage provides good balance for the canine body and great harmony for their minds. It is
good for canine muscles but also aids in relaxing and lengthening the tendons and ligaments
as well, especially in senior dogs.

A. Almost definitely! With age, dogs tend to become stiff and experience discomfort regularly.
A massage will help increase their flexibility, improve circulation and oxygen to the brain and
also detect medical issues that may be or become an issue.

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